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Romanus Pinus Christogrammae (Chi-Rho) www.zazzle.com/romanus_pinus_christogrammae_chi_rho_gold_finish_lapel_pin-256451302343637854 Very detailed miniature antique style artwork. X P - The …More
Romanus Pinus Christogrammae (Chi-Rho) www.zazzle.com/romanus_pinus_christogrammae_chi_rho_gold_finish_lapel_pin-256451302343637854 Very detailed miniature antique style artwork. X P - The Chi Rho is one of the earliest forms of christogram, and is used by Christians. It is formed by superimposing the first two letters in the Greek spelling of the word Christ, the original language of the Christian Testament. A W - Alpha and Omega- first and last letters of Greek alphabet signify Christ's Divine designation- clear testament to His absolute and unqualified Deity. Apoc. 22:12: Ἰδοὺ ἔρχομαι ταχύ, καὶ ὁ μισθός μου μετ' ἐμοῦ, ἀποδοῦναι ἑκάστῳ ὡς τὸ ἔργον ἐστὶν αὐτοῦ. ἐγὼ τὸ Ἄλφα καὶ τὸ Ὦ, ὁ πρῶτος καὶ ὁ ἔσχατος, ἡ ἀρχὴ καὶ τὸ τέλος. Ecce venio cito, et merces mea mecum est, reddere unicuique secundum opera sua. Ego sum alpha et omega, primus et novissimus, principium et finis. Patience, I am coming soon; and with me comes the award I make, repaying each man according to the life he has lived. am Alpha, I am Omega, I am before all, I am at the end of all, the beginning of all things and their end. The Chi Rho invokes the crucifixion of Jesus as well as symbolizing his status as the Christ. There is early evidence of the Chi Rho symbol on Christian Rings of the third century. The Chi Rho is one of the earliest forms of christogram, and is used by Christians. It is formed by superimposing the first two letters in the Greek spelling of the word Christ ( Greek : "ρσό" ), chi = ch and rho = r, in such a way to produce the monogram . The Chi-Rho symbol was also used by pagan Greek scribes to mark, in the margin, a particularly valuable or relevant passage; the combined letters Chi and Rho standing for chrston, meaning "good." Although not technically a cross, the Chi Rho invokes the crucifixion of Jesus as well as symbolizing his status as the Christ. There is early evidence of the Chi Rho symbol on Christian Rings of the third century. Christian accounts of Constantine's adoption of the Chi-Rho. According to Lactantius, a Latin historian of North African origins saved from poverty by the patronage of Constantine I as tutor to his son Crispus, Constantine had dreamt of being ordered to put a "heavenly divine symbol" (Latin: coeleste signum dei) on the shields of his soldiers. The description of the actual symbol chosen by Constantine the next morning, as reported by Lactantius, is not very clear: it closely resembles a Chi Rho or a staurogram, a similar Christian symbol. That very day Constantine's army fought the forces of Maxentius and won the Battle of the Milvian Bridge (312), outside Rome. Writing in Greek, Eusebius of Caesarea (died in 339), the bishop who wrote the first surviving general history of the early Christian churches, gave two different accounts of the events. In his church history, written shortly after the battle, when Eusebius didn't yet have any contact with Constantine, he doesn't mention any dream or vision, but compares the defeat of Maxentius (drowned in the Tiber) to that of the biblical pharaoh and credits Constantine's victory to divine protection. Constantine's labarum, a standard incorporating the Chi-Rho, from an antique silver medal. In a memoir of the emperor that Eusebius wrote after Constantine's death (On the Life of Constantine, ca 337339), a miraculous appearance came in Gaul long before the Milvian Bridge battle. In this later version, the emperor had been pondering the misfortunes that befall commanders that invoke the help of many different gods, and decided to seek divine aid in the forthcoming battle from the One God. At noon Constantine saw a cross of light imposed over the sun. Attached to it, in Greek characters, was the saying "οω ία!". Not only Constantine, but the whole army saw the miracle. That night Christ appeared to the emperor in a dream and told him to make a replica of the sign he had seen in the sky, which would be a sure defense in battle. Eusebius wrote in the Vita that Constantine himself had told him this story "and confirmed it with oaths," late in life "when I was deemed worthy of his acquaintance and company." "Indeed," says Eusebius, "had anyone else told this story, it would not have been easy to accept it." As Constantine during his last few years enjoyed what he considered direct contact with God, it is likely that the story should be credited to Constantine, rather than to Eusebius[clarification needed]. Eusebius also left a description of the labarum, the military standard which incorporated the Chi-Rho sign, used by Constantine in his later wars against Licinius. Gratias ago tibi Deo per instrumenta Durani Treeni, sic opus imprimatur pro bono. Creative Commons Attribution to Duran Treen - Reuse is Allowed: ADAGIO FOR STRINGS by DURAN TREEN TV is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution. Cf. work : www.youtube.com/watch?v=npfxFHP56Fs #ChiRho #CatholicChristian #Christogram patreon.com/ProVaticanus