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Aquinas Septuagesima Index

Christopher Anadale Overview of daily meditations from St. Thomas Aquinas for the week of Septuagesima Septuagesima 2020 is Feb 9-15 Septuagesima 2021 is Jan 31-Feb 6 Septuagesima 2022 is Feb 13-19 …More
Christopher Anadale Overview of daily meditations from St. Thomas Aquinas for the week of Septuagesima

Septuagesima 2020 is Feb 9-15
Septuagesima 2021 is Jan 31-Feb 6
Septuagesima 2022 is Feb 13-19
The word Septuagesima is Latin for “seventieth.” It is both the name of the liturgical season and the name of the Sunday. Septuagesima Sunday marks the beginning of the shortest liturgical season. This season is seventeen (17) days long, and includes the three Sundays before Ash Wednesday. The length of the season never changes, but the start date is dependent on the movable date of Easter that can fall between March 22-April 25. Septuagesima Sunday can be as early as January 18.
The origins of Septuagesima as a liturgical season are obscure. This is the last liturgical season to be added to the Universal Liturgical Calendar. The roots are Roman, and it is not mentioned until the sixth century during the time of Pope St. Gregory the Great. It is often thought St. Gregory himself might have written the Mass formularies, especially since the content reflects so much of the conflict and suffering during that time:
The note of sadness in most of the texts of these Masses has given rise to the theory that they were composed at a time when Italy, and Rome in particular, were once more exposed to barbarian invasions, and threatened with misfortunes similar to this which had overwhelmed them in the fifth century. The sixth century, the time of the institution of Septuagesima, was also a period of pillage and havoc, and hence we have a sorrowful echo in the petitions framed at this time (The Year’s Liturgy, Vol. 1, Fernand Cabrol, p. 101).
The Septuagesima season was to help people ease into Lent as a type of preconditioning program. Liturgically it looked and felt very much like Lent. The Gloria and Alleluia were no longer allowed, the tone was very penitential, the priest wore purple vestments, and flowers were no longer allowed on the altar. The main difference would be that there were no fasting requirements in the later centuries.
www.catholicculture.org/…/what-is-septuag…