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Archaeologists have unearthed the mosaic floors of the lost Church of the Apostles. Archaeologists from Israel and the United States claim they have unearthed the ruins of the long-lost Church of …More
Archaeologists have unearthed the mosaic floors of the lost Church of the Apostles. Archaeologists from Israel and the United States claim they have unearthed the ruins of the long-lost Church of the Apostles. This famed religious building was said to have been built sometime in the fifth or sixth century AD in the ancient fishing village of Bethsaida in Palestine, on top of the foundation of the former home of Jesus’ apostles Peter and Andrew. Until now, neither the village nor the church had ever been confirmed found. But archaeologists affiliated with the El-Araj Excavation Project, who’ve been digging for years at a site near the confluence of the Jordan River and the Sea of Galilee, are convinced the search for both is over. During the most recent excavations at El-Araj, the archaeologists were delighted to unearth a beautiful and well-preserved red, yellow, and orange mosaic floor, made in the Byzantine style. It was estimated to be approximately 1,500 years old, and it was inscribed with a pair of messages written in ancient Greek. We identified a large apse in the east and uncovered two inscriptions, the archaeologists explained, in a press release issued by the New York-based Center for the Study of Ancient Judaism and Christian Origins. While the smaller one mentions a deacon and a building project, the larger inscription is a half medallion and speaks of the bishop and reconstruction of the building. All of this is proof positive that the building was a Christian church, and that it was built during the period when the lands of ancient Palestine were under Byzantine (Eastern Roman Empire) authority. While the inscriptions don’t offer any historical facts about the church, the archaeologists are virtually certain they’ve found the long-lost Church of the Apostles, based on a multi-year accumulation of circumstantial evidence. Source: ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/bethsaida-mosaic-0015980