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Jan. 23 Blessed Marianne Cope. breski1 | January 23, 2010 Mother Marianne Cope, christened Maria Anna Barbara Koob (1838–1918), was a Franciscan nun of the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Franc…More
Jan. 23 Blessed Marianne Cope.

breski1 | January 23, 2010 Mother Marianne Cope, christened Maria Anna Barbara Koob (1838–1918), was a Franciscan nun of the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis, a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church. Born in Heppenheim (Germany) and entered religious life in Syracuse, New York, she worked, lived and died for the lepers on the island of Moloka'i in Hawai'i. Despite close contact with the patients over several years, she was not herself afflicted by the disease, considered by some to be miraculous.
Mother Marianne was the first person beatified by Pope Benedict XVI and raised to the title of Blessed Marianne of Moloka'i, awaiting canonization into sainthood.[1] Her feast day is January 23 celebrated by her followers, especially her religious order, the Diocese of Honolulu, and the Diocese of Syracuse.
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JANUARY 23, 2011
DAILY PRAYER WITH REGNUM CHRISTI
IMMEDIATE RESPONSES TO HIS CALL
January 23, 2011
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
Father Paul Moreau, LC
Matthew 4:12-23
When Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew to Galilee.
He left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum by the sea, in the
region of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what had been said through
Isaiah the prophet …More
JANUARY 23, 2011
DAILY PRAYER WITH REGNUM CHRISTI
IMMEDIATE RESPONSES TO HIS CALL
January 23, 2011
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
Father Paul Moreau, LC
Matthew 4:12-23
When Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew to Galilee.
He left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum by the sea, in the
region of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what had been said through
Isaiah the prophet might be fulfilled: "Land of Zebulun and land of
Naphtali, the way to the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the
Gentiles, the people who sit in darkness have seen a great light, on
those dwelling in a land overshadowed by death light has arisen".
From that time on, Jesus began to preach and say, "Repent, for the
kingdom of heaven is at hand." As he walked by the Sea of Galilee, he
saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and his brother Andrew,
casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them,
"Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men." At once they
left their nets and followed him. He walked along from there, and saw
two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John. They
were in a boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He
called them, and immediately they left the boat and their father, and
followed him. He went around all of Galilee, teaching in their
synagogues and proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom and curing every
disease and illness among the people.
Introductory Prayer: Jesus, what a beautiful day in the life of
your disciples: you walked along the shore and called them! I wish
to respond to your gentle call in the same way they did. I know that
you will never lead me astray; rather, you will protect me and lead
me home to heaven. Here I am Lord, at your service.
Petition: My dear Lord Jesus, help me follow you faithfully without
weighing the cost.
1. Just Walking along the Shore It might appear that Christ's
meeting his first disciples was a chance encounter: He was out
walking and saw them. The overall context tells us much more. John
was in prison, and Jesus knew his time had come. A significant part
of his mission for the next three years would be to teach and form
his apostles. These apostles had been selected by Divine Providence
since the beginning of time, and now the call to them was made.
These were not chance encounters. Jesus knew who he wanted and what
he would ask of them. He also knows each of us and what he wants from
each of us. His love and attention are entirely personal and very
important to him.
2. A Simple Call When Jesus engages the rich young man later in his
life (cf. Matthew 19:16-22), the conversation is much more involved
than the brief meetings in today's Gospel. Here, Jesus approaches and
asks the four men to follow him. It is simple, and it is brief. Many
other steps in their mission will be made known later. For now:
"Follow me!" We cannot spend our lives waiting for God's call to do
something great. In the process we might miss the many simple calls
of everyday life: calls to be more charitable with our friends and
family, calls to be more patient with our children, calls to be more
generous in helping a neighbor in need. Be generous in the small
things, and then we will be generous in the greater things.
3. They Left Everything The disciples' response was heroic. They
followed immediately, totally and joyfully. What is my attitude to
God's will in my life? His will is made known to me through the
norms and laws of his Church and through the indications of my
superiors or parents. Do I respond selflessly? Or do I count the cost
and negotiate a deal before I follow him? "What can I get out of
this?" I will get an eternity of bliss only if I generously follow
him.
Conversation with Christ: Lord, I need to understand better that
you desire a personal and intimate relationship with me like. What
can I do to show better my gratitude for your call? For your graces?
Help me see that it makes a difference to you how I respond. To you
I am not a number or a statistic. I am a soul for which you died.
Resolution: Today I will deal with others in a way consistent with
my condition as an adopted child of God. I will avoid any pettiness
or selfishness in responding to the requests of others.
meditation.regnumchristi.org
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Mother Marianne of Molokai, a leader in the religious community of the Sisters of Saint Francis in Syracuse, NY., received both church and state honors posthumously in 2005 when she was proclaimed Blessed at the Vatican in May and was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame at Seneca Falls, NY, in October. Known for her works of heroic charity in New York State, she chose to respond to a …More
Mother Marianne of Molokai, a leader in the religious community of the Sisters of Saint Francis in Syracuse, NY., received both church and state honors posthumously in 2005 when she was proclaimed Blessed at the Vatican in May and was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame at Seneca Falls, NY, in October. Known for her works of heroic charity in New York State, she chose to respond to a call of desperation from Hawaii in 1883 for a hospital leader to set up a system of care for its poor and sick. She led the Franciscan mission until the end of her life spending her last thirty years at the settlement for leprosy patients at Kalaupapa, Molokai.
Biography Of Mother Marianne Cope
Family and Early Life

Mother Marianne, formerly Barbara Koob (variants: Kob, Kopp, and now officially Cope) was born on January 23, 1838 and baptized the following day in what is now SE Hessen, West Germany. She was the daughter of farmer, Peter Koob, and Barbara Witzenbacher Koob. Peter Koob’s first wife had nine children before she died, only two of whom reached adulthood.
By his second wife, Barbara’s mother, Peter Koob had five children in Germany, and five in the United States. In 1839, the year following Barbara’s birth, the family emigrated to the United States to seek opportunity.
The Koob family became members of St. Joseph’s Parish in Utica, N.Y., where the children attended the parish school. In 1848, Barbara received her First Holy Communion and was confirmed at St. John’s parish in Utica, when in accordance with the practice of the time, the bishop of the diocese came to the largest church in the area to administer these two sacraments at the same ceremony.
When Peter Koob became a naturalized citizen in the 1850s so did his children who were minors at the time become American citizens including his daughter Barbara.
Mother Marianne wrote of experiencing a religious life calling at an early age and that the following of her vocation was delayed nine years because of her family obligations. The oldest child at home, she, after completing an eighth grade education, went to work in a factory to support the family when her father had become an invalid. It only was at the time that her younger siblings were of age to be self-providing that she felt free to enter the convent. She did so one month after her father’s death in the summer of 1862. She was twenty-four years of age.
Growth in Religious Life
Barbara entered the Sisters of Saint Francis in Syracuse, N.Y. and, on November 19, 1862, she was invested at the Church of the Assumption. She soon became prominently known as Sister Marianne.
One year later at the same church on the same day of the month, Sister Marianne was professed as a religious after which time she served as a teacher and principal in several beginning schools in New York State. She had joined the Order in Syracuse with the intention of doing schoolwork, but her life soon became a series of administrative appointments. As a member of the governing boards of her religious community, she participated during the 1860s in the establishment of two of the first hospitals in the central New York area, St. Elizabeth’s in Utica (1866) and St. Joseph’s in Syracuse (1869). Both hospitals begun by the Franciscan sisters had unique charters for their time being open to the sick without distinction as to a person’s nationality, religion or color. These two hospitals were among the first sixty registered hospitals in the entire United States.
blessedmariannecope.org/biography.html