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Vatican Admits Breaking Away From “What The Church Once Did”

The Vatican’s Handbook on Ecumenism (December 4) admits breaking with Catholic tradition.

Number 17 claims that Catholics “not only can but indeed must” seek out opportunities to pray with other Christians, yet they should understand that some Christian communities don't practise joint prayer, ”as was once the case for the Catholic Church.” The handbook recommends praying together the psalms and scriptural canticles.

It is easy to show that the demands contained in the handbook oppose Catholic doctrine:

• Synod of Laodicea (363): “No one shall pray in common with heretics and schismatics.”
• Council of Carthage (397): “No one must either pray or sing psalms with heretics.”
• Canon Law (1917): “It is not licit for Catholics to attend or take part in an active way in non-Catholic ceremonies.”
• Congregation of the Holy Office (1949): “Any communication whatsoever in worship must be avoided.”

Handbook 20 recommends that Catholic and other Christian “ministers” preach during each other’s non-Eucharistic services.

Handbook 36 claims that the Faith and a “proper disposition” are sufficient for non-Catholics to receive Communion. The Council of Trent condemns this position and defines that Faith alone is NOT a sufficient basis for receiving Communion because Confession is also needed.

The Handbook manipulates the language by introducing words like “interconfessional” and “interchurch.” It uses the term "Churches" for non-catholic communities without distinction, capitalised for Orthodox communities and in the lowercase for Protestant sects.

Picture: © Mazur, CC BY-NC-SA, #newsBxvbxenjsx

Ultraviolet
Unfortunately, one aspect of this is licit according to current Catholic doctrine and has been for many years.

The Chruch's official decree on ecumenism "Unitatis Redintegratio" states, "In certain special circumstances, such as the prescribed prayers "for unity," and during ecumenical gatherings, it is allowable, indeed desirable that Catholics should join in prayer with their separated …More
Unfortunately, one aspect of this is licit according to current Catholic doctrine and has been for many years.

The Chruch's official decree on ecumenism "Unitatis Redintegratio" states, "In certain special circumstances, such as the prescribed prayers "for unity," and during ecumenical gatherings, it is allowable, indeed desirable that Catholics should join in prayer with their separated brethren. Such prayers in common are certainly an effective means of obtaining the grace of unity, and they are a true expression of the ties which still bind Catholics to their separated brethren."

What this "Handbook" is advancing, however, is NOT supported by the decree. Namely, expanding praying "in certain special circumstances" "for unity" to including praying with non-Catholics at any time on any topic.
James Preisendorfer 5681142 shares this
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This is heresy!
Ultraviolet
Not according to Canon Law 751, it isn't. This is certainly a change from established Catholic law and tradition but not, technically, heresy.
AlexBKaiser
Evangelicals are a joke
Dr Bobus
I'm from a non Catholic family. I fulfilled any obligation to pray with Protestants long ago
Ultraviolet
Canon Law trumps the handbook. For me, that's the end of the discussion.
P. O'B
What was once considered mortal sin under divine law (NOT Church law) is now recommended. How can this be the Catholic religion?
Ratsmea
We're all in One World Religion church now. The remnants are the winners.
Hugh N. Cry
Faith of our fathers not so precious as we thought? I’m not buying what they’re trying to sell.