Domino Effect Picture: © gloria.tv, CC BY-ND, #newsPehnawvzhgMore
Domino Effect

Picture: © gloria.tv, CC BY-ND, #newsPehnawvzhg
Aaron-Jozef
Het instorten van het Novus Ordo Rooms Katholieke geloof van na het Tweede Vaticaanse Concilie heeft een domino effect.
John A Cassani
The 1955 Good Friday liturgy is a sort of proto- Novus ordo.
John A Cassani
@Mathathias Maccabeus I agree with you, for the most part. The reform of the Good Friday liturgy is one that really has always hit me hard. It’s so unnatural to walk into church on the day that Our Lord was crucified to see that the crucifix has been removed from the church. Worse than that, the Procession of the Cross supplants the procession of the Eucharist as the major liturgical action. …More
@Mathathias Maccabeus I agree with you, for the most part. The reform of the Good Friday liturgy is one that really has always hit me hard. It’s so unnatural to walk into church on the day that Our Lord was crucified to see that the crucifix has been removed from the church. Worse than that, the Procession of the Cross supplants the procession of the Eucharist as the major liturgical action. Was it really necessary to introduce the distribution of Holy Communion, with the odd switching to purple vestments for the occasion? I could go on. On the subject of the reform of the Breviary, I agree that it set an unfortunate precedent. I could argue that it just affected the clergy, but, what affects the clergy flows down to all the faithful. This year was difficult for anyone at an FSSP parish, as they saw it as an in opportune time to ask for an extension for their permission to use the pre-55 Rites. It’s one thing to analyze changes on paper, but another to experience unfortunate things in reality.
John A Cassani
@Mathathias Maccabeus I have to agree with you that there were some unfortunate losses that happened with the Tridentine reform, sequences prominent among them. Of course, arguably the biggest part of the reform was that the Roman Rite was recommended to the whole Latin Church, while allowing Rites over 200 years old to continue. Most took Rome up on the offer, which was all the sweeter since …More
@Mathathias Maccabeus I have to agree with you that there were some unfortunate losses that happened with the Tridentine reform, sequences prominent among them. Of course, arguably the biggest part of the reform was that the Roman Rite was recommended to the whole Latin Church, while allowing Rites over 200 years old to continue. Most took Rome up on the offer, which was all the sweeter since the books were made cheaply, by the standards of the day, on that new invention. Of course, this reform was done in order to fight rampant heresy. The reforms of the ‘50s and ‘60s were not, even though heresy was indeed rampant. These reforms were pushed by academics and religious, who couldn’t have cared less about the genuine spiritual needs of the faithful. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” right?