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John [17:20-26] Jesus Prays for His Disciples Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 17,20-26. Lifting up his eyes to heaven, Jesus prayed saying: "I pray not only for them, but also …More
John [17:20-26] Jesus Prays for His Disciples

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 17,20-26.
Lifting up his eyes to heaven, Jesus prayed saying: "I pray not only for them, but also for those who will believe in me through their word,
so that they may all be one, as you, Father, are in me and I in you, that they also may be in us, that the world may believe that you sent me.
And I have given them the glory you gave me, so that they may be one, as we are one,
I in them and you in me, that they may be brought to perfection as one, that the world may know that you sent me, and that you loved them even as you loved me.
Father, they are your gift to me. I wish that where I am they also may be with me, that they may see my glory that you gave me, because you loved me before the foundation of the world.
Righteous Father, the world also does not know you, but I know you, and they know that you sent me.
I made known to them your name and I will make it known, that the love with which you loved me may be in them and I in them."

Copyright © Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, USCCB

Vatican Council II
Decree on Ecumenism "Unitatis Redintegratio", 7-8, Copyright © Libreria Editrice Vaticana)

“So that they may all be one”

There can be no ecumenism worthy of the name without a change of heart. For it is from renewal of the inner life of our minds (Ep 4:23), from self-denial and an unstinted love that desires of unity take their rise and develop in a mature way. (...) All the faithful should remember that the more effort they make to live holier lives according to the Gospel, the better will they further Christian unity and put it into practice. For the closer their union with the Father, the Word, and the Spirit, the more deeply and easily will they be able to grow in mutual brotherly love. This change of heart and holiness of life, along with public and private prayer for the unity of Christians, should be regarded as the soul of the whole ecumenical movement, and merits the name, "spiritual ecumenism." It is a recognized custom for Catholics to have frequent recourse to that prayer for the unity of the Church which the Saviour Himself on the eve of His death so fervently appealed to His Father: "That they may all be one". In certain special circumstances, such as the prescribed prayers "for unity," and during ecumenical gatherings, it is allowable, indeed desirable that Catholics should join in prayer with their separated brethren. Such prayers in common are certainly an effective means of obtaining the grace of unity, and they are a true expression of the ties which still bind Catholics to their separated brethren. "For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them" (Mt 18:20).