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April 16 The Gospel breski1 Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 6,1-15. Jesus went across the Sea of Galilee. A large crowd followed him, because they saw the signs he was performing …More
April 16 The Gospel breski1

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 6,1-15.
Jesus went across the Sea of Galilee.
A large crowd followed him, because they saw the signs he was performing on the sick.
Jesus went up on the mountain, and there he sat down with his disciples.
The Jewish feast of Passover was near.
When Jesus raised his eyes and saw that a large crowd was coming to him, he said to Philip, "Where can we buy enough food for them to eat?"
He said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do.
Philip answered him, "Two hundred days' wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little (bit)."
One of his disciples, Andrew, the brother of Simon Peter, said to him,
There is a boy here who has five barley loaves and two fish; but what good are these for so many?
Jesus said, "Have the people recline." Now there was a great deal of grass in that place. So the men reclined, about five thousand in number.
Then Jesus took the loaves, gave thanks, and distributed them to those who were reclining, and also as much of the fish as they wanted.
When they had had their fill, he said to his disciples, "Gather the fragments left over, so that nothing will be wasted."
So they collected them, and filled twelve wicker baskets with fragments from the five barley loaves that had been more than they could eat.
When the people saw the sign he had done, they said, "This is truly the Prophet, the one who is to come into the world."
Since Jesus knew that they were going to come and carry him off to make him king, he withdrew again to the mountain alone.


Copyright © Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, USCCB

Saint Ephrem (c.306-373)
deacon in Syria, Doctor of the Church
Diatessaron, 12, 4-5, 11 (trans. SC 121, p. 214f.)


“They gathered twelve baskets full of pieces left over”
In the twinkling of an eye the Lord multiplied a little bread. What human beings do in ten months of work, his ten fingers do in an instant (…) Nevertheless, he didn't measure this miracle by its power, but according to the hunger of those who were there. If the miracle had been measured by its power, it would be impossible to evaluate it; measured according to the hunger of those thousands of people, the miracle went beyond the twelve baskets. Among artisans, their power is inferior to the customers' desire; they cannot do everything that is asked of them. Contrary to them, what God accomplishes goes beyond all desire (…)
When they had been satiated like the Israelites in past times through the prayer of Moses, they cried out: “This is undoubtedly the Prophet who is to come into the world.” They were referring to the words of Moses: “A prophet like me will the Lord, your God, raise up for you.” Not just any prophet, but “a prophet like me” (Dt 18:15), who will satiate you with bread in the desert. Like me, he walked on the sea, he appeared in the luminous cloud (Mt 17:5), he freed his people. He handed Mary over to John just like Moses handed over his flock to Joshua (…) But the bread of Moses was not perfect; it was only given to the Israelites. Because he wanted to show that his gift is superior to that of Moses, and the call to the nations still more perfect, our Lord said: “If anyone eats this bread he shall live forever,” for the bread from God “has come down from heaven” and is given to the whole world (Jn 6:51).