The Vatican has known all along that Benedict's Act of Renuncation was invalid, and here is the …

April 8, 2019 A.D. — The Vatican has known all along that Pope Benedict’s Act of Renunciation was not in conformity with the requirements of Pope John Paul II’s Code of Canon Law, and the documentary…More
April 8, 2019 A.D. — The Vatican has known all along that Pope Benedict’s Act of Renunciation was not in conformity with the requirements of Pope John Paul II’s Code of Canon Law, and the documentary evidence to prove it has been published by the Vatican for 6 years.
fromrome.wordpress.com/…/the-vatican-has…
Lalanz
I would like to welcome everyone into the spiritual chastisement that is in the Fátima 3rd secret... 2019 we are living in it...pray for mercy and the true consecration of Russia the way the Virgin Mary asked for it to be done, not the fake versions that was performed in the past!!!!
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What is the difference between munus Petri and ministerium Petri?
The munus is the office, the ministerium is the service rendered by the office. To renounce the ministry but not the office is analogus to Say, This is my Physical Appearances and Actions, instead of This is my Body. That kind of error would make the Consecration of the Host invalid, just as it makes invalid a papal resignation. Its the difference between accidents and substances
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Not really.

Munus is used to designate both the sacramental-ontological function and the juridical-canonical function. Thus a bishop needs sacramental powers for the munus sanctificandi but not for the munus docendi (which for the pope includes Infallibility).

To put it another way, one munus concerns Potestas Ordinis, the other Potestas Iurisdictionis. BXVI renounced the latter, preferring to …More
Not really.

Munus is used to designate both the sacramental-ontological function and the juridical-canonical function. Thus a bishop needs sacramental powers for the munus sanctificandi but not for the munus docendi (which for the pope includes Infallibility).

To put it another way, one munus concerns Potestas Ordinis, the other Potestas Iurisdictionis. BXVI renounced the latter, preferring to refer to ministerium rather than munus because he did not renounce the munus that concerns Sacramental functions.
Also, BXVI did not need to conform to canon law. In so far as he was exercising Papal powers, if he said it was an adequate renunciation, the it was.
Dr Bobus what is the difference between sacramental powers for the 'munus' sanctificandi of bishop of Rome and all other diocesan bishops?
Dr Bobus
There is none--and that includes auxiliary bishops. All have presbyteral sacramental powers and the power to ordain.

And there is no need to put munus in quotes. It is found in canon law. Also munus docendi
Dr Bobus Your base premise "there is none - all (bishops) have (identical- because no difference) presbyteral sacramental powers and the power to ordain (bishops)." leads to a logical conclusion you presume: "that pope Benedict XVI is now licitly and validly retired, Emeritus, and there is now licitly and validly pope Francis occupying the Throne of Peter" in accordance - with canonic history -…More
Dr Bobus Your base premise "there is none - all (bishops) have (identical- because no difference) presbyteral sacramental powers and the power to ordain (bishops)." leads to a logical conclusion you presume: "that pope Benedict XVI is now licitly and validly retired, Emeritus, and there is now licitly and validly pope Francis occupying the Throne of Peter" in accordance - with canonic history - Revelation, Tradition and Magisterium. If conclusion is wrong then correct.

If the above conclusion is correct then there are in reality two popes one retired(contemplativo) and one working (activo). Analogous to many diocesan bishops...

As I understand we both agree the retired pope emeritus BXVI has not returned to former ecclesiastical position - Cardinal or lower?
Dr Bobus, your argument is pure gratituous assertion, because Benedict renounced a ministerium, which no where in Canon Law is the potestas iurisdictionis, because potestas in Canon law is found only in sacraments and offices, and canon 145 defines every officium as a munus, not a ministerium. Sorry.
For why a renunciation in canon law, philosophy and theology must be of the munus, not the ministerium to be valid see the footnote to the article above.
Dr Bobus
Of course, it was gratutious. No one paid me.

1. Jurisdiction (potestas iurisdictionis) is the authority of a bishop that is non sacramental. It is the munus docendi and munus regendi (I have my doubts that the latter exists, now that Prince Archbishops are a thing of the past). The distincion between potestas ordinis and potestas iurisdictionis is very old. I prefer them to the munera etc., …More
Of course, it was gratutious. No one paid me.

1. Jurisdiction (potestas iurisdictionis) is the authority of a bishop that is non sacramental. It is the munus docendi and munus regendi (I have my doubts that the latter exists, now that Prince Archbishops are a thing of the past). The distincion between potestas ordinis and potestas iurisdictionis is very old. I prefer them to the munera etc., which if memory serves are of Calvinist origin. But those in power opted for the munera route.

2. After Vat II the decision was made by Paul VI that it would no longer be SOP that a diocesan bishop died with his boots on. Retirement at 75. Before this policy if a bishop had to retire for illness, etc., he would be given a titular see after retirement, which meant that he would be an auxiliary bishop. The titular see meant that he would have authority juridically but not actually. In fact, my home town was once the Archdiocesan see. Many years ago that changed, and it is now titular. A retired bishop in another diocese did not want to be emeritus. He cameto the archdiocese and became an auxiliary.

3. When the 75 retirement decision was made, it was accompanied by the emeritus designation. So the question follows: What is the difference between an auxiliary bishop and an emeritus? According to the Congregation of Bishops a bishop emeritus retains the munus docendi, unless the new bishop denies it.

4 So I think that BXVI used the phrase ministerium Petri because he decided on Pope Emeritus rather than returning to being Cardinal Ratzinger.

5. Btw, coadjustor bishops not only have the right of succession, they also can be given by Rome different aspects of the Ordinary's non Sacramental power. During the reign of JPII, an American archbishop was kept in office even though most of his power was given by Rome to the coadjutor. The archbishop was little else than a figurehead.
IMPORTANT.
BrAlexisBugnolo at first glance it appears the Polish version contains analogous errors. And that it was translated from other language than Latin. If you link to the whole 'Declaratio' truly rendered in English from Latin then I will be able to highlight errors...
Thank you Rafal! Here is the correct English translation of the Latin > fromrome.wordpress.com/…/litteral-englis…
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